U.S. sets paper import dumping margins for Brazil, Indonesia

lunes 11 de enero de 2016 19:55 GYT
 

WASHINGTON Jan 11 (Reuters) - The U.S. Commerce Department on Monday announced anti-dumping duties of 2.05 percent to 222.46 percent on imports of uncoated paper sheets from Australia, Brazil, China, Indonesia and Portugal, determining that these products were sold at less than fair value.

The action follows a nearly year-long investigation into the the pricing of imported uncoated sheets for copy paper, envelopes, book pages, utility bills and other uses.

In 2014, the United States imported $211 million of uncoated paper from Brazil, $200 million from Indonesia, $164 million from Portugal, $61 million from Australia and $54 million from China, the Commerce Department's U.S. International Trade Commission said.

Australia's Paper Australia Pty Ltd received the highest dumping margin of 222.46 percent, while margins for other Australian firms were set at 138.87 percent.

In China, Asia Symbol (Guangdong) Paper Co Ltd and Asia Symbol (Shandong) Pulp and Paper Co Ltd received a dumping margin of 84.05 percent, while other firms received a 149 percent dumping margin.

Indonesian producers Indah Kiat Pulp & Paper TBK, Pabrik Kertas Tjiwi Kimia Tbk PT and Pindo Deli Pulp and Paper Mills PT received a 17.39 percent dumping rate based on their failure to participate in the investigation, while other Indonesian firms received a 2.05 percent dumping margin.

In Brazil, International Paper do Brasil Ltda, a unit of International Paper received a 41.39 percent dumping margin, while Suzano Papel e Celulose SA received a 22.16 percent margin and all other Brazilian firms received a 26.95 percent margin.

Portugese firms, including Portucel SA, received a 7.8 percent dumping margin.

A final injury determination in the paper case is expected on or about Feb. 22, the Commerce Department said. The original complaint was made by Domtar Corp, Finch Paper Holdings, Packaging Corp of America and PH Glatfelter Co and two U.S. labor unions. (Reporting By David Lawder; Editing by Bernard Orr)