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América Latina
Fotos | lunes 13 de enero de 2020 18:50 CLST

Coastal Canadian town abuzz over possible move there by Harry and Meghan

A couple walks on the beach outside the property, where according to British news reports Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, spent the holidays at the end of 2019, in North Saanich, British Columbia, Canada January 11, 2020. Towns on the southern end of Vancouver Island on Canada's west coast are abuzz with interest over the possibility that Harry and Meghan will become semi-permanent residents there.

REUTERS/Kevin Light

A couple walks on the beach outside the property, where according to British news reports Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, spent the holidays at the end of 2019, in North Saanich, British Columbia, Canada January 11, 2020. Towns on the...more

A couple walks on the beach outside the property, where according to British news reports Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, spent the holidays at the end of 2019, in North Saanich, British Columbia, Canada January 11, 2020. Towns on the southern end of Vancouver Island on Canada's west coast are abuzz with interest over the possibility that Harry and Meghan will become semi-permanent residents there. REUTERS/Kevin Light
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A property, where according to reports Harry and Meghan spent the holidays, in North Saanich, British Columbia. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex sparked an uproar on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean when they said that they would be stepping back from their senior roles in the British royal family.

REUTERS/Kevin Light

A property, where according to reports Harry and Meghan spent the holidays, in North Saanich, British Columbia. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex sparked an uproar on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean when they said that they would be stepping back from...more

A property, where according to reports Harry and Meghan spent the holidays, in North Saanich, British Columbia. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex sparked an uproar on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean when they said that they would be stepping back from their senior roles in the British royal family. REUTERS/Kevin Light
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According to media reports, Meghan has gone back to the Saanich Peninsula, a part of Vancouver Island just north of British Columbia's capital, Victoria, an area where the family took a six-week vacation at the end of last year.

REUTERS/Kevin Light

According to media reports, Meghan has gone back to the Saanich Peninsula, a part of Vancouver Island just north of British Columbia's capital, Victoria, an area where the family took a six-week vacation at the end of last year. REUTERS/Kevin Light

According to media reports, Meghan has gone back to the Saanich Peninsula, a part of Vancouver Island just north of British Columbia's capital, Victoria, an area where the family took a six-week vacation at the end of last year. REUTERS/Kevin Light
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The couple have captured residents' fascination since their vacation in the area, which has "a really interesting mix of very wealthy people and middle-class people," said North Saanich resident Beth Doman. "There's a lot of hidden mansions, so we were all trying to figure out where they were staying."

REUTERS/Kevin Light

The couple have captured residents' fascination since their vacation in the area, which has "a really interesting mix of very wealthy people and middle-class people," said North Saanich resident Beth Doman. "There's a lot of hidden mansions, so we...more

The couple have captured residents' fascination since their vacation in the area, which has "a really interesting mix of very wealthy people and middle-class people," said North Saanich resident Beth Doman. "There's a lot of hidden mansions, so we were all trying to figure out where they were staying." REUTERS/Kevin Light
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Towns on the peninsula, which has long been popular with retirees thanks to its laid-back pace of life and proximity to ferries to the British Columbia mainland, mostly have fewer than 20,000 residents and are filled with ocean-themed gift shops, boutiques and fish-and-chip huts.

REUTERS/Kevin Light

Towns on the peninsula, which has long been popular with retirees thanks to its laid-back pace of life and proximity to ferries to the British Columbia mainland, mostly have fewer than 20,000 residents and are filled with ocean-themed gift shops,...more

Towns on the peninsula, which has long been popular with retirees thanks to its laid-back pace of life and proximity to ferries to the British Columbia mainland, mostly have fewer than 20,000 residents and are filled with ocean-themed gift shops, boutiques and fish-and-chip huts. REUTERS/Kevin Light
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Despite the curiosity, locals are determined to give them privacy. "The last thing they want is mobs of people coming around and taking their picture," said Ron Buschgens, owner of Lolly Gobble Sweet Shop in Sidney. "That would start to settle down as people got used to the idea of them being here."

REUTERS/Kevin Light

Despite the curiosity, locals are determined to give them privacy. "The last thing they want is mobs of people coming around and taking their picture," said Ron Buschgens, owner of Lolly Gobble Sweet Shop in Sidney. "That would start to settle down...more

Despite the curiosity, locals are determined to give them privacy. "The last thing they want is mobs of people coming around and taking their picture," said Ron Buschgens, owner of Lolly Gobble Sweet Shop in Sidney. "That would start to settle down as people got used to the idea of them being here." REUTERS/Kevin Light
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Many residents declined to speak to reporters on the record, saying they wished to respect the couple's privacy. "Harry's mother died because of all the attention that was on her and it was very tragic," Sidney resident Lynn Salituro said, referring to the late Princess Diana. "I'm sure they just want to break away and have a safe haven and somewhere they can live a normal life."

REUTERS/Kevin Light

Many residents declined to speak to reporters on the record, saying they wished to respect the couple's privacy. "Harry's mother died because of all the attention that was on her and it was very tragic," Sidney resident Lynn Salituro said, referring...more

Many residents declined to speak to reporters on the record, saying they wished to respect the couple's privacy. "Harry's mother died because of all the attention that was on her and it was very tragic," Sidney resident Lynn Salituro said, referring to the late Princess Diana. "I'm sure they just want to break away and have a safe haven and somewhere they can live a normal life." REUTERS/Kevin Light
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A property, where according to reports Harry and Meghan spent the holidays, in North Saanich, British Columbia. REUTERS/Kevin Light

A property, where according to reports Harry and Meghan spent the holidays, in North Saanich, British Columbia. REUTERS/Kevin Light

A property, where according to reports Harry and Meghan spent the holidays, in North Saanich, British Columbia. REUTERS/Kevin Light
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A general view of a property in Sidney, British Columbia. REUTERS/Stringer

A general view of a property in Sidney, British Columbia. REUTERS/Stringer

A general view of a property in Sidney, British Columbia. REUTERS/Stringer
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A general view of Victoria International Airport. REUTERS/Kevin Light

A general view of Victoria International Airport. REUTERS/Kevin Light

A general view of Victoria International Airport. REUTERS/Kevin Light
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A general view of Victoria International Airport. REUTERS/Kevin Light

A general view of Victoria International Airport. REUTERS/Kevin Light

A general view of Victoria International Airport. REUTERS/Kevin Light
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A property, where according to reports Harry and Meghan spent the holidays, in North Saanich, British Columbia. REUTERS/Kevin Light

A property, where according to reports Harry and Meghan spent the holidays, in North Saanich, British Columbia. REUTERS/Kevin Light

A property, where according to reports Harry and Meghan spent the holidays, in North Saanich, British Columbia. REUTERS/Kevin Light
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