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Fotos | jueves 14 de febrero de 2019 17:40 CLST

Mars Opportunity rover goes dark

A self-portrait of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, taken with multiple frames with the rover's panoramic camera (Pancam) during March 22 through March 24, 2014 on planet Mars.

Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell University/Arizona State University/Handout via REUTERS

A self-portrait of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, taken with multiple frames with the rover's panoramic camera (Pancam) during March 22 through March 24, 2014 on planet Mars. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell University/Arizona State...more

A self-portrait of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, taken with multiple frames with the rover's panoramic camera (Pancam) during March 22 through March 24, 2014 on planet Mars. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell University/Arizona State University/Handout via REUTERS
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Tracks from the Opportunity rover are visible on the surface of Mars, August 4, 2010.

Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech/Handout via REUTERS

Tracks from the Opportunity rover are visible on the surface of Mars, August 4, 2010. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech/Handout via REUTERS

Tracks from the Opportunity rover are visible on the surface of Mars, August 4, 2010. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech/Handout via REUTERS
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A 360-degree digitally compressed panorama image of Mars, made from some of 800 images sent from the Opportunity rover on Mars, shown in exaggerated colors to highlight different surface features released on July 9, 2012. The image shows past tracks of Opportunity (L), Opportunity's dust-covered solar panels across the image bottom and an interior wall of 20-kilometer Endeavour Crater just below the horizon and right of center. 

REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/Arizona State University/Handout

A 360-degree digitally compressed panorama image of Mars, made from some of 800 images sent from the Opportunity rover on Mars, shown in exaggerated colors to highlight different surface features released on July 9, 2012. The image shows past tracks...more

A 360-degree digitally compressed panorama image of Mars, made from some of 800 images sent from the Opportunity rover on Mars, shown in exaggerated colors to highlight different surface features released on July 9, 2012. The image shows past tracks of Opportunity (L), Opportunity's dust-covered solar panels across the image bottom and an interior wall of 20-kilometer Endeavour Crater just below the horizon and right of center. REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/Arizona State University/Handout
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The shadow of Opportunity is pictured in this late-afternoon image taken by the rover's rear hazard avoidance camera March 20, 2014. The rover's shadow falls across a slope called the McClure-Beverlin Escarpment on the western rim of Endeavour Crater, where Opportunity is investigating rock layers for evidence about ancient environments. 

REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Handout via Reuters

The shadow of Opportunity is pictured in this late-afternoon image taken by the rover's rear hazard avoidance camera March 20, 2014. The rover's shadow falls across a slope called the McClure-Beverlin Escarpment on the western rim of Endeavour...more

The shadow of Opportunity is pictured in this late-afternoon image taken by the rover's rear hazard avoidance camera March 20, 2014. The rover's shadow falls across a slope called the McClure-Beverlin Escarpment on the western rim of Endeavour Crater, where Opportunity is investigating rock layers for evidence about ancient environments. REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Handout via Reuters
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The Opportunity rover is perched on the southeast rim on the "Santa Maria" crater of Mars, taken with the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, March 9, 2011. The rover is the bluish speck at about the four o'clock position on the crater rim (with indicator arrow). North is up. Rover tracks are visible to the west of the crater. 

REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona/Handout

The Opportunity rover is perched on the southeast rim on the "Santa Maria" crater of Mars, taken with the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, March 9, 2011. The rover is the bluish speck...more

The Opportunity rover is perched on the southeast rim on the "Santa Maria" crater of Mars, taken with the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, March 9, 2011. The rover is the bluish speck at about the four o'clock position on the crater rim (with indicator arrow). North is up. Rover tracks are visible to the west of the crater. REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona/Handout
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Small spherical objects fill the field in an area about 2.4 inches across, at an outcrop called "Kirkwood" in the Cape York segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater on Mars, in this mosaic combining four images from the Microscopic Imager on Opportunity, September 6, 2012. The individual spherules are up to about one-eighth inch (3 millimeters) in diameter.

REUTERS/NASA/Handout

Small spherical objects fill the field in an area about 2.4 inches across, at an outcrop called "Kirkwood" in the Cape York segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater on Mars, in this mosaic combining four images from the Microscopic Imager on...more

Small spherical objects fill the field in an area about 2.4 inches across, at an outcrop called "Kirkwood" in the Cape York segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater on Mars, in this mosaic combining four images from the Microscopic Imager on Opportunity, September 6, 2012. The individual spherules are up to about one-eighth inch (3 millimeters) in diameter. REUTERS/NASA/Handout
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The arm of Opportunity is seen extended toward a light-toned rock, "Tisdale 2", during the 2,695th Martian day, or "sol", of the rover's work on Mars, in this picture taken by the rover's front hazard-avoidance camera, August 23, 2011. The rock, "Tisdale 2", is about 12 inches (30 cm) tall. The rover used two instruments on the robotic arm, the microscopic imager and the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, to examine Tisdale 2. In this image, the turret at the end of the arm is positioned so that the microscopic imager is facing the rock. 

REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Handout

The arm of Opportunity is seen extended toward a light-toned rock, "Tisdale 2", during the 2,695th Martian day, or "sol", of the rover's work on Mars, in this picture taken by the rover's front hazard-avoidance camera, August 23, 2011. The rock,...more

The arm of Opportunity is seen extended toward a light-toned rock, "Tisdale 2", during the 2,695th Martian day, or "sol", of the rover's work on Mars, in this picture taken by the rover's front hazard-avoidance camera, August 23, 2011. The rock, "Tisdale 2", is about 12 inches (30 cm) tall. The rover used two instruments on the robotic arm, the microscopic imager and the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, to examine Tisdale 2. In this image, the turret at the end of the arm is positioned so that the microscopic imager is facing the rock. REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Handout
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This 360-degree scene assembled from images taken by the navigation camera on Opportunity shows terrain surrounding the position where the rover spent its 3,000th Martian day on July 2, 2012, or sol, working on Mars. The scene is presented as a polar projection in this image, with north at the top. The Sol 3000 site is near the northern tip of the Cape York segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater. Bright toned material lines the perimeter of Cape York. The component images of this scene were taken during sols 2989 through 2991.

REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Handout

This 360-degree scene assembled from images taken by the navigation camera on Opportunity shows terrain surrounding the position where the rover spent its 3,000th Martian day on July 2, 2012, or sol, working on Mars. The scene is presented as a polar...more

This 360-degree scene assembled from images taken by the navigation camera on Opportunity shows terrain surrounding the position where the rover spent its 3,000th Martian day on July 2, 2012, or sol, working on Mars. The scene is presented as a polar projection in this image, with north at the top. The Sol 3000 site is near the northern tip of the Cape York segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater. Bright toned material lines the perimeter of Cape York. The component images of this scene were taken during sols 2989 through 2991. REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Handout
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A piece of crater ejecta near the Mars Concepcion crater is seen in this picture taken with Opportunity's Panoramic Camera and released December 8, 2011.

REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Handout

A piece of crater ejecta near the Mars Concepcion crater is seen in this picture taken with Opportunity's Panoramic Camera and released December 8, 2011. REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Handout

A piece of crater ejecta near the Mars Concepcion crater is seen in this picture taken with Opportunity's Panoramic Camera and released December 8, 2011. REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Handout
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An afternoon shadow stretches into Endeavour Crater on August 23, 2012, taken with the front hazard-avoidance camera on the rover Opportunity as it was perched on the western rim of the crater, which is 14 miles (22 kilometers) in diameter. 

REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Handout

An afternoon shadow stretches into Endeavour Crater on August 23, 2012, taken with the front hazard-avoidance camera on the rover Opportunity as it was perched on the western rim of the crater, which is 14 miles (22 kilometers) in diameter....more

An afternoon shadow stretches into Endeavour Crater on August 23, 2012, taken with the front hazard-avoidance camera on the rover Opportunity as it was perched on the western rim of the crater, which is 14 miles (22 kilometers) in diameter. REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Handout
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A mineral vein called "Homestake", about the width of a thumb and about 18 inches (45 centimeters) long, taken with the panoramic camera (Pancam) on Opportunity, November 7, 2011. Opportunity examined the vein in November 2011 and found it to be rich in calcium and sulfur, possibly the calcium-sulfate mineral gypsum. Homestake is near the edge of the "Cape York" segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater. The view is presented in approximate true color. This "natural color" is the rover team's best estimate of what the scene would look like if humans were there and able to see it with their own eyes.

REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/ASU/Handout

A mineral vein called "Homestake", about the width of a thumb and about 18 inches (45 centimeters) long, taken with the panoramic camera (Pancam) on Opportunity, November 7, 2011. Opportunity examined the vein in November 2011 and found it to be rich...more

A mineral vein called "Homestake", about the width of a thumb and about 18 inches (45 centimeters) long, taken with the panoramic camera (Pancam) on Opportunity, November 7, 2011. Opportunity examined the vein in November 2011 and found it to be rich in calcium and sulfur, possibly the calcium-sulfate mineral gypsum. Homestake is near the edge of the "Cape York" segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater. The view is presented in approximate true color. This "natural color" is the rover team's best estimate of what the scene would look like if humans were there and able to see it with their own eyes. REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/ASU/Handout
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A rock called "Marquette Island" that was examined by Opportunity from mid-November 2009 until mid-January 2010, is seen in this image taken January 6, 2010. Studies of texture and composition suggest that this rock, not much bigger than a basketball, originated deep inside the Martian crust. A crater-digging impact could have excavated the rock and thrown it a long distance, to where Opportunity found it along the rover's long trek across the Meridiani plain toward Endeavour Crater. This true-color view of Marquette Island comes from combining three exposures that Opportunity's panoramic camera took through different filters during the rover's 2,117th Martian day on Mars. 

REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/Handout

A rock called "Marquette Island" that was examined by Opportunity from mid-November 2009 until mid-January 2010, is seen in this image taken January 6, 2010. Studies of texture and composition suggest that this rock, not much bigger than a...more

A rock called "Marquette Island" that was examined by Opportunity from mid-November 2009 until mid-January 2010, is seen in this image taken January 6, 2010. Studies of texture and composition suggest that this rock, not much bigger than a basketball, originated deep inside the Martian crust. A crater-digging impact could have excavated the rock and thrown it a long distance, to where Opportunity found it along the rover's long trek across the Meridiani plain toward Endeavour Crater. This true-color view of Marquette Island comes from combining three exposures that Opportunity's panoramic camera took through different filters during the rover's 2,117th Martian day on Mars. REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/Handout
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Opportunity used its navigation camera to record this view at the end of a 364-foot drive on the 2,353rd Martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission on Mars on September 6, 2010. Opportunity began the trip from Victoria to Endeavour crater in September 2008 after two years of exploring in and around Victoria. After the rover science team selected Endeavour as the rover's next long-term destination, observations of Endeavour's rim by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter revealed the presence of clay minerals. This finding makes the site an even more compelling science destination. Clay minerals, which form exclusively under wet conditions, have been found extensively on Mars from orbit, but have not been examined on the surface.

REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell University/Handout

Opportunity used its navigation camera to record this view at the end of a 364-foot drive on the 2,353rd Martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission on Mars on September 6, 2010. Opportunity began the trip from Victoria to Endeavour crater in...more

Opportunity used its navigation camera to record this view at the end of a 364-foot drive on the 2,353rd Martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission on Mars on September 6, 2010. Opportunity began the trip from Victoria to Endeavour crater in September 2008 after two years of exploring in and around Victoria. After the rover science team selected Endeavour as the rover's next long-term destination, observations of Endeavour's rim by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter revealed the presence of clay minerals. This finding makes the site an even more compelling science destination. Clay minerals, which form exclusively under wet conditions, have been found extensively on Mars from orbit, but have not been examined on the surface. REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell University/Handout
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Tracks left by Opportunity as it travels along the rim of Victoria Crater can be seen clearly in this image taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft June 26, 2007. Opportunity first approached Victoria Crater at an alcove informally named "Duck Bay" (see tracks L). It then drove along the crater's sinuous edge in a clockwise direction before heading back to Duck Bay, where it entered the crater in early July 2007.

REUTERS/NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/Handout

Tracks left by Opportunity as it travels along the rim of Victoria Crater can be seen clearly in this image taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft June 26, 2007....more

Tracks left by Opportunity as it travels along the rim of Victoria Crater can be seen clearly in this image taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft June 26, 2007. Opportunity first approached Victoria Crater at an alcove informally named "Duck Bay" (see tracks L). It then drove along the crater's sinuous edge in a clockwise direction before heading back to Duck Bay, where it entered the crater in early July 2007. REUTERS/NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/Handout
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This false color image captured by Opportunity shows "Cape St. Vincent," one of the many promontories that jut out from the walls of Victoria Crater on Mars, May 16, 2007. Scientists say this bright band represents what used to be the surface of Mars just before an impact formed Victoria Crater. The image is presented in false color to accentuate differences in surface materials. 

REUTERS/NASA/JPL/Cornell/Handout

This false color image captured by Opportunity shows "Cape St. Vincent," one of the many promontories that jut out from the walls of Victoria Crater on Mars, May 16, 2007. Scientists say this bright band represents what used to be the surface of Mars...more

This false color image captured by Opportunity shows "Cape St. Vincent," one of the many promontories that jut out from the walls of Victoria Crater on Mars, May 16, 2007. Scientists say this bright band represents what used to be the surface of Mars just before an impact formed Victoria Crater. The image is presented in false color to accentuate differences in surface materials. REUTERS/NASA/JPL/Cornell/Handout
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An extreme close-up of round, blueberry-shaped formations in the Martian soil near a part of the rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum called Stone Mountain, taken by Opportunity and released released February 12, 2004. Scientists studied these curious formations for clues about the soil's formation. 

REUTERS/HO/NASA/JPL/Cornell JDP

An extreme close-up of round, blueberry-shaped formations in the Martian soil near a part of the rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum called Stone Mountain, taken by Opportunity and released released February 12, 2004. Scientists studied these curious...more

An extreme close-up of round, blueberry-shaped formations in the Martian soil near a part of the rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum called Stone Mountain, taken by Opportunity and released released February 12, 2004. Scientists studied these curious formations for clues about the soil's formation. REUTERS/HO/NASA/JPL/Cornell JDP
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A detail of the planet Mars that scientists claim shows evidence that parts of the planet were once covered in water, released March 2, 2004.

REUTERS/NASA/Handout

A detail of the planet Mars that scientists claim shows evidence that parts of the planet were once covered in water, released March 2, 2004. REUTERS/NASA/Handout

A detail of the planet Mars that scientists claim shows evidence that parts of the planet were once covered in water, released March 2, 2004. REUTERS/NASA/Handout
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A view of Mars' Meridiani Planum region, which brought the rover Opportunity to within about 160 feet of the rim of 'Victoria Crater' on September 18, 2006. Opportunity reached a location from which the navigation camera on top of the rover's mast could begin to see into the interior of Victoria. This mosaic of five frames taken by the navigation camera reveals the upper portion of interior crater walls facing toward Opportunity from up to about 850 meters (half a mile) away. 

REUTERS/NASA/JPL/Caltech/Handout

A view of Mars' Meridiani Planum region, which brought the rover Opportunity to within about 160 feet of the rim of 'Victoria Crater' on September 18, 2006. Opportunity reached a location from which the navigation camera on top of the rover's mast...more

A view of Mars' Meridiani Planum region, which brought the rover Opportunity to within about 160 feet of the rim of 'Victoria Crater' on September 18, 2006. Opportunity reached a location from which the navigation camera on top of the rover's mast could begin to see into the interior of Victoria. This mosaic of five frames taken by the navigation camera reveals the upper portion of interior crater walls facing toward Opportunity from up to about 850 meters (half a mile) away. REUTERS/NASA/JPL/Caltech/Handout
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A detail of the planet Mars that scientists claim shows evidence that parts of the planet were once covered in water, in this image released March 2, 2004.

REUTERS/NASA/Handout

A detail of the planet Mars that scientists claim shows evidence that parts of the planet were once covered in water, in this image released March 2, 2004. REUTERS/NASA/Handout

A detail of the planet Mars that scientists claim shows evidence that parts of the planet were once covered in water, in this image released March 2, 2004. REUTERS/NASA/Handout
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The Martian landscape at Meridiani Planum is seen in one of the first images beamed back to Earth from Opportunity shortly after the rover touched down, released January 25, 2004. The image was captured by the rover's panoramic camera.

REUTERS/NASA/JPL/Cornell FG

The Martian landscape at Meridiani Planum is seen in one of the first images beamed back to Earth from Opportunity shortly after the rover touched down, released January 25, 2004. The image was captured by the rover's panoramic...more

The Martian landscape at Meridiani Planum is seen in one of the first images beamed back to Earth from Opportunity shortly after the rover touched down, released January 25, 2004. The image was captured by the rover's panoramic camera. REUTERS/NASA/JPL/Cornell FG
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An overhead perspective of the rover Opportunity, taken with its navigation camera, after it touched down at Meridiani Planum on Mars, at approximately 9.05pm PST on January 24, 2004.

REUTERS/NASA/JPL

An overhead perspective of the rover Opportunity, taken with its navigation camera, after it touched down at Meridiani Planum on Mars, at approximately 9.05pm PST on January 24, 2004. REUTERS/NASA/JPL

An overhead perspective of the rover Opportunity, taken with its navigation camera, after it touched down at Meridiani Planum on Mars, at approximately 9.05pm PST on January 24, 2004. REUTERS/NASA/JPL
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A rock outcropping that lies to the northwest of Opportunity after the rover landed after safely inside a shallow impact crater at Meridiani Planum, January 28, 2004. 

REUTERS/HO/NASA/JPL/Cornell

A rock outcropping that lies to the northwest of Opportunity after the rover landed after safely inside a shallow impact crater at Meridiani Planum, January 28, 2004. REUTERS/HO/NASA/JPL/Cornell

A rock outcropping that lies to the northwest of Opportunity after the rover landed after safely inside a shallow impact crater at Meridiani Planum, January 28, 2004. REUTERS/HO/NASA/JPL/Cornell
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An image from the panoramic camera on Opportunity after it touched down at Meridiani Planum on Mars, January 24, 2004. 

REUTERS/NASA/JPL

An image from the panoramic camera on Opportunity after it touched down at Meridiani Planum on Mars, January 24, 2004. REUTERS/NASA/JPL

An image from the panoramic camera on Opportunity after it touched down at Meridiani Planum on Mars, January 24, 2004. REUTERS/NASA/JPL
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Opportunity, or the Mars Exploration Rover-B, takes off on the maiden flight of a Delta II 7925H9.5 rocket, at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Florida, July 7, 2003. 

REUTERS/Karl Ronstrom

Opportunity, or the Mars Exploration Rover-B, takes off on the maiden flight of a Delta II 7925H9.5 rocket, at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Florida, July 7, 2003. REUTERS/Karl Ronstrom

Opportunity, or the Mars Exploration Rover-B, takes off on the maiden flight of a Delta II 7925H9.5 rocket, at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Florida, July 7, 2003. REUTERS/Karl Ronstrom
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Pete Theisinger, Mars Exploration Rover Project Manager, celebrates the successful egress of the Opportunity rover at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, January 31, 2004. 

REUTERS/Stringer

Pete Theisinger, Mars Exploration Rover Project Manager, celebrates the successful egress of the Opportunity rover at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, January 31, 2004. REUTERS/Stringer

Pete Theisinger, Mars Exploration Rover Project Manager, celebrates the successful egress of the Opportunity rover at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, January 31, 2004. REUTERS/Stringer
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NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (L), celebrates with the Director of JPL Dr. Charles Elachi (C) alongside NASA Associate Administrator for Space Sciences Dr. Ed Whiler (R) as they watch as the first images from the Opportunity streamed into the control room of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California early January 25, 2004.

REUTERS/Damian Dovarganes/Pool

NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (L), celebrates with the Director of JPL Dr. Charles Elachi (C) alongside NASA Associate Administrator for Space Sciences Dr. Ed Whiler (R) as they watch as the first images from the Opportunity streamed into the...more

NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (L), celebrates with the Director of JPL Dr. Charles Elachi (C) alongside NASA Associate Administrator for Space Sciences Dr. Ed Whiler (R) as they watch as the first images from the Opportunity streamed into the control room of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California early January 25, 2004. REUTERS/Damian Dovarganes/Pool
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NASA JPL Senior Engineer Dr. Edward W. Tunstel Jr. points out features on a life-size replica of Opportunity at the In-Situ Instrument Laboratory at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, February 4, 2004. 

REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

NASA JPL Senior Engineer Dr. Edward W. Tunstel Jr. points out features on a life-size replica of Opportunity at the In-Situ Instrument Laboratory at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, February 4, 2004. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

NASA JPL Senior Engineer Dr. Edward W. Tunstel Jr. points out features on a life-size replica of Opportunity at the In-Situ Instrument Laboratory at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, February 4, 2004. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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