Edición:
América Latina
Fotos | lunes 20 de enero de 2020 16:35 CLST

The life of Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. speaks after meeting with President Lyndon B. Johnson to discuss civil rights at the White House in Washington, December 3, 1963. Library of Congress/Warren K. Leffler/Handout via REUTERS

Martin Luther King Jr. speaks after meeting with President Lyndon B. Johnson to discuss civil rights at the White House in Washington, December 3, 1963. Library of Congress/Warren K. Leffler/Handout via REUTERS

Martin Luther King Jr. speaks after meeting with President Lyndon B. Johnson to discuss civil rights at the White House in Washington, December 3, 1963. Library of Congress/Warren K. Leffler/Handout via REUTERS
Close
1 / 24
Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X wait for a press conference to begin in an unknown location, March 26, 1964. Library of Congress/Marion S. Trikosko/Handout via REUTERS

Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X wait for a press conference to begin in an unknown location, March 26, 1964. Library of Congress/Marion S. Trikosko/Handout via REUTERS

Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X wait for a press conference to begin in an unknown location, March 26, 1964. Library of Congress/Marion S. Trikosko/Handout via REUTERS
Close
2 / 24
Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy meets with civil rights leaders in the Rose Garden of the White House, Washington, June 22, 1963. 

Abbie Rowe, National Parks Service/JFK Presidential Library and Museum/Handout via REUTERS

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy meets with civil rights leaders in the Rose Garden of the White House, Washington, June 22, 1963. Abbie Rowe, National Parks Service/JFK Presidential Library and Museum/Handout via REUTERS

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy meets with civil rights leaders in the Rose Garden of the White House, Washington, June 22, 1963. Abbie Rowe, National Parks Service/JFK Presidential Library and Museum/Handout via REUTERS
Close
3 / 24
Martin Luther King Jr. speaks at a press conference in an unknown location, March 2, 1965. Library of Congress/Warren K. Leffler/Handout via REUTERS

Martin Luther King Jr. speaks at a press conference in an unknown location, March 2, 1965. Library of Congress/Warren K. Leffler/Handout via REUTERS

Martin Luther King Jr. speaks at a press conference in an unknown location, March 2, 1965. Library of Congress/Warren K. Leffler/Handout via REUTERS
Close
4 / 24
A crowd surrounds the Reflecting Pool and continues to the Washington Monument during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

A crowd surrounds the Reflecting Pool and continues to the Washington Monument during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

A crowd surrounds the Reflecting Pool and continues to the Washington Monument during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
Close
5 / 24
Martin Luther King Jr. is seen with other civil rights leaders during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Martin Luther King Jr. is seen with other civil rights leaders during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Martin Luther King Jr. is seen with other civil rights leaders during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
Close
6 / 24
Marchers hold signs during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Marchers hold signs during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Marchers hold signs during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
Close
7 / 24
People carry signs for equal rights, integrated schools, decent housing and an end to bias during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

People carry signs for equal rights, integrated schools, decent housing and an end to bias during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

People carry signs for equal rights, integrated schools, decent housing and an end to bias during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
Close
8 / 24
Civil rights leaders meet with President John F. Kennedy in the Oval Office of the White House following the March on Washington, August 28, 1963.

REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Civil rights leaders meet with President John F. Kennedy in the Oval Office of the White House following the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Civil rights leaders meet with President John F. Kennedy in the Oval Office of the White House following the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
Close
9 / 24
The wreckage of a bomb explosion near the Gaston Motel where Martin Luther King, Jr., and leaders in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference were staying during the Birmingham campaign of the Civil Rights movement, May 14, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

The wreckage of a bomb explosion near the Gaston Motel where Martin Luther King, Jr., and leaders in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference were staying during the Birmingham campaign of the Civil Rights movement, May 14, 1963. REUTERS/Library...more

The wreckage of a bomb explosion near the Gaston Motel where Martin Luther King, Jr., and leaders in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference were staying during the Birmingham campaign of the Civil Rights movement, May 14, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
Close
10 / 24
Congress of Racial Equality members conduct a march in memory of those killed in the Birmingham bombings, carrying a sign that says "No More Birminghams" in Washington, September 22, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Congress of Racial Equality members conduct a march in memory of those killed in the Birmingham bombings, carrying a sign that says "No More Birminghams" in Washington, September 22, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Congress of Racial Equality members conduct a march in memory of those killed in the Birmingham bombings, carrying a sign that says "No More Birminghams" in Washington, September 22, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
Close
11 / 24
Participants march in a civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, 1965. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Participants march in a civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, 1965. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Participants march in a civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, 1965. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
Close
12 / 24
Martin Luther King Jr. (3rd R) is seen in an unknown location on August 5, 1965, a day before President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act into law. Library of Congress/Marion S. Trikosko/Handout via REUTERS

Martin Luther King Jr. (3rd R) is seen in an unknown location on August 5, 1965, a day before President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act into law. Library of Congress/Marion S. Trikosko/Handout via REUTERS

Martin Luther King Jr. (3rd R) is seen in an unknown location on August 5, 1965, a day before President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act into law. Library of Congress/Marion S. Trikosko/Handout via REUTERS
Close
13 / 24
People demonstrate after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. in front of the White House in Washington, April 1968. The sign reads: "Let his death not be in vain." Library of Congress/Marion S. Trikosko/Handout via REUTERS

People demonstrate after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. in front of the White House in Washington, April 1968. The sign reads: "Let his death not be in vain." Library of Congress/Marion S. Trikosko/Handout via REUTERS

People demonstrate after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. in front of the White House in Washington, April 1968. The sign reads: "Let his death not be in vain." Library of Congress/Marion S. Trikosko/Handout via REUTERS
Close
14 / 24
A soldier stands guard at 7th and N Street, N.W., Washington, with the ruins of buildings destroyed during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., April 8, 1968. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

A soldier stands guard at 7th and N Street, N.W., Washington, with the ruins of buildings destroyed during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., April 8, 1968. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

A soldier stands guard at 7th and N Street, N.W., Washington, with the ruins of buildings destroyed during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., April 8, 1968. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
Close
15 / 24
Firefighters spray water on shops, including Beyda's, Miles Shoes and Grayson's, that were burned during the riots in Washington that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., April 1968. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Firefighters spray water on shops, including Beyda's, Miles Shoes and Grayson's, that were burned during the riots in Washington that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., April 1968. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Firefighters spray water on shops, including Beyda's, Miles Shoes and Grayson's, that were burned during the riots in Washington that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., April 1968. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
Close
16 / 24
A "Don't Work" sign promotes a day to honor the one-year anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., on a shop on H Street, N.W., Washington, April 3, 1969. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

A "Don't Work" sign promotes a day to honor the one-year anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., on a shop on H Street, N.W., Washington, April 3, 1969. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

A "Don't Work" sign promotes a day to honor the one-year anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., on a shop on H Street, N.W., Washington, April 3, 1969. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
Close
17 / 24
A store that was destroyed during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. is seen in Washington, April 16, 1968. Library of Congress/Warren K. Leffler/Handout via REUTERS

A store that was destroyed during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. is seen in Washington, April 16, 1968. Library of Congress/Warren K. Leffler/Handout via REUTERS

A store that was destroyed during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. is seen in Washington, April 16, 1968. Library of Congress/Warren K. Leffler/Handout via REUTERS
Close
18 / 24
Smoke rises near the U.S. Capitol, during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., April 6, 1968. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Smoke rises near the U.S. Capitol, during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., April 6, 1968. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Smoke rises near the U.S. Capitol, during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., April 6, 1968. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
Close
19 / 24
James Earl Ray, the man who assassinated Martin Luther King Jr., is transported in Memphis, Tennessee, 1968. 

REUTERS/Shelby County Register of Deeds/Handout

James Earl Ray, the man who assassinated Martin Luther King Jr., is transported in Memphis, Tennessee, 1968. REUTERS/Shelby County Register of Deeds/Handout

James Earl Ray, the man who assassinated Martin Luther King Jr., is transported in Memphis, Tennessee, 1968. REUTERS/Shelby County Register of Deeds/Handout
Close
20 / 24
James Earl Ray is patted down in Memphis, Tennessee, 1968. 

REUTERS/Shelby County Register of Deeds/Handout

James Earl Ray is patted down in Memphis, Tennessee, 1968. REUTERS/Shelby County Register of Deeds/Handout

James Earl Ray is patted down in Memphis, Tennessee, 1968. REUTERS/Shelby County Register of Deeds/Handout
Close
21 / 24
A wreath hangs on the balcony of the former Lorraine Motel, now part of the National Civil Rights Museum, where Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee, April 2, 2008. 

REUTERS/Mike Segar

A wreath hangs on the balcony of the former Lorraine Motel, now part of the National Civil Rights Museum, where Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee, April 2, 2008. REUTERS/Mike Segar

A wreath hangs on the balcony of the former Lorraine Motel, now part of the National Civil Rights Museum, where Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee, April 2, 2008. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Close
22 / 24
Room 306 at the former Lorraine Motel, where Martin Luther King Jr. slept before he was assassinated in 1968, seen in Memphis, Tennessee, April 2, 2008. 

REUTERS/Mike Segar

Room 306 at the former Lorraine Motel, where Martin Luther King Jr. slept before he was assassinated in 1968, seen in Memphis, Tennessee, April 2, 2008. REUTERS/Mike Segar

Room 306 at the former Lorraine Motel, where Martin Luther King Jr. slept before he was assassinated in 1968, seen in Memphis, Tennessee, April 2, 2008. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Close
23 / 24
The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial is shown in Washington August 22, 2011. The memorial to the American civil rights leader was officially dedicated on August 28, 2011, the 48th anniversary of King's "I have a dream" speech on the Washington Mall. 

REUTERS/Jason Reed

The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial is shown in Washington August 22, 2011. The memorial to the American civil rights leader was officially dedicated on August 28, 2011, the 48th anniversary of King's "I have a dream" speech on the Washington Mall....more

The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial is shown in Washington August 22, 2011. The memorial to the American civil rights leader was officially dedicated on August 28, 2011, the 48th anniversary of King's "I have a dream" speech on the Washington Mall. REUTERS/Jason Reed
Close
24 / 24

Siguiente Galería

Marking the Orthodox Epiphany

Orthodox Christians celebrate Epiphany by immersing themselves in waters.

lunes 20 de enero de 2020

SAG Awards red carpet

Fashion highlights from the 2020 Screen Actors Guild Awards.

lunes 20 de enero de 2020

Best of the SAG Awards

Highlights from the 2020 Screen Actors Guild Awards in Los Angeles.

lunes 20 de enero de 2020

Animals at risk in Australian bushfires

As many as a billion animals are estimated to have either died in Australia's wildfires or are at risk in the aftermath due to a lack of food and shelter.

domingo 19 de enero de 2020

Más en Fotos

Americans protest coronavirus restrictions

Americans protest coronavirus restrictions

Protesters across the U.S. rally against stay-at-home orders and mask mandates aimed at reducing the spread of coronavirus.

America celebrates the Fourth of July

America celebrates the Fourth of July

America celebrates 244 years of independence with fireworks and social distancing as it fights the coronavirus outbreak and protesters march for racial equality.

Protests against racial inequality sweep across America

Protests against racial inequality sweep across America

The killing of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer last month has spawned a wave of protests and national soul-searching over systemic racism in the United States.

Hot dog champions

Hot dog champions

Joey Chestnut and Miki Sudo set records and retain their titles at Nathan's Famous Fourth of July International Hot Dog Eating Contest behind closed doors in Brooklyn due to the coronavirus outbreak.

Trump visits Mount Rushmore

Trump visits Mount Rushmore

President Donald Trump accused "angry mobs" of trying to erase history with efforts to remove or rethink monuments to U.S. historical figures and used a speech at Mount Rushmore to paint himself as a bulwark against left-wing extremism.

Life in the age of coronavirus

Life in the age of coronavirus

People around the world adapt to a new normal of staying at home, social distancing and masks during the coronavirus pandemic.

Burying the victims of coronavirus

Burying the victims of coronavirus

Morgues and cemeteries struggle to bury the victims of COVID-19 as some countries fear a second wave of cases.

Botswana investigating mystery deaths of 275 elephants

Botswana investigating mystery deaths of 275 elephants

Authorities are investigating the unexplained deaths over the past months. Poaching has been ruled out as the carcasses were found intact.

Isolated Amazon tribe fears coronavirus infection

Isolated Amazon tribe fears coronavirus infection

Soldiers handed out masks and nurses tested for COVID-19 in a military operation to protect isolated tribes including the Yanomami in the Amazon rainforest, where dozens of indigenous communities have been infected with the latest disease to come from the outside to threaten their existence.