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América Latina
Fotos | lunes 20 de enero de 2020 16:35 CLST

The life of Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. speaks after meeting with President Lyndon B. Johnson to discuss civil rights at the White House in Washington, December 3, 1963. Library of Congress/Warren K. Leffler/Handout via REUTERS

Martin Luther King Jr. speaks after meeting with President Lyndon B. Johnson to discuss civil rights at the White House in Washington, December 3, 1963. Library of Congress/Warren K. Leffler/Handout via REUTERS

Martin Luther King Jr. speaks after meeting with President Lyndon B. Johnson to discuss civil rights at the White House in Washington, December 3, 1963. Library of Congress/Warren K. Leffler/Handout via REUTERS
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Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X wait for a press conference to begin in an unknown location, March 26, 1964. Library of Congress/Marion S. Trikosko/Handout via REUTERS

Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X wait for a press conference to begin in an unknown location, March 26, 1964. Library of Congress/Marion S. Trikosko/Handout via REUTERS

Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X wait for a press conference to begin in an unknown location, March 26, 1964. Library of Congress/Marion S. Trikosko/Handout via REUTERS
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Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy meets with civil rights leaders in the Rose Garden of the White House, Washington, June 22, 1963. 

Abbie Rowe, National Parks Service/JFK Presidential Library and Museum/Handout via REUTERS

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy meets with civil rights leaders in the Rose Garden of the White House, Washington, June 22, 1963. Abbie Rowe, National Parks Service/JFK Presidential Library and Museum/Handout via REUTERS

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy meets with civil rights leaders in the Rose Garden of the White House, Washington, June 22, 1963. Abbie Rowe, National Parks Service/JFK Presidential Library and Museum/Handout via REUTERS
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Martin Luther King Jr. speaks at a press conference in an unknown location, March 2, 1965. Library of Congress/Warren K. Leffler/Handout via REUTERS

Martin Luther King Jr. speaks at a press conference in an unknown location, March 2, 1965. Library of Congress/Warren K. Leffler/Handout via REUTERS

Martin Luther King Jr. speaks at a press conference in an unknown location, March 2, 1965. Library of Congress/Warren K. Leffler/Handout via REUTERS
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A crowd surrounds the Reflecting Pool and continues to the Washington Monument during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

A crowd surrounds the Reflecting Pool and continues to the Washington Monument during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

A crowd surrounds the Reflecting Pool and continues to the Washington Monument during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
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Martin Luther King Jr. is seen with other civil rights leaders during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Martin Luther King Jr. is seen with other civil rights leaders during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Martin Luther King Jr. is seen with other civil rights leaders during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
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Marchers hold signs during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Marchers hold signs during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Marchers hold signs during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
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People carry signs for equal rights, integrated schools, decent housing and an end to bias during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

People carry signs for equal rights, integrated schools, decent housing and an end to bias during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

People carry signs for equal rights, integrated schools, decent housing and an end to bias during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
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Civil rights leaders meet with President John F. Kennedy in the Oval Office of the White House following the March on Washington, August 28, 1963.

REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Civil rights leaders meet with President John F. Kennedy in the Oval Office of the White House following the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Civil rights leaders meet with President John F. Kennedy in the Oval Office of the White House following the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
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The wreckage of a bomb explosion near the Gaston Motel where Martin Luther King, Jr., and leaders in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference were staying during the Birmingham campaign of the Civil Rights movement, May 14, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

The wreckage of a bomb explosion near the Gaston Motel where Martin Luther King, Jr., and leaders in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference were staying during the Birmingham campaign of the Civil Rights movement, May 14, 1963. REUTERS/Library...more

The wreckage of a bomb explosion near the Gaston Motel where Martin Luther King, Jr., and leaders in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference were staying during the Birmingham campaign of the Civil Rights movement, May 14, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
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Congress of Racial Equality members conduct a march in memory of those killed in the Birmingham bombings, carrying a sign that says "No More Birminghams" in Washington, September 22, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Congress of Racial Equality members conduct a march in memory of those killed in the Birmingham bombings, carrying a sign that says "No More Birminghams" in Washington, September 22, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Congress of Racial Equality members conduct a march in memory of those killed in the Birmingham bombings, carrying a sign that says "No More Birminghams" in Washington, September 22, 1963. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
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Participants march in a civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, 1965. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Participants march in a civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, 1965. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Participants march in a civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, 1965. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
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Martin Luther King Jr. (3rd R) is seen in an unknown location on August 5, 1965, a day before President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act into law. Library of Congress/Marion S. Trikosko/Handout via REUTERS

Martin Luther King Jr. (3rd R) is seen in an unknown location on August 5, 1965, a day before President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act into law. Library of Congress/Marion S. Trikosko/Handout via REUTERS

Martin Luther King Jr. (3rd R) is seen in an unknown location on August 5, 1965, a day before President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act into law. Library of Congress/Marion S. Trikosko/Handout via REUTERS
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People demonstrate after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. in front of the White House in Washington, April 1968. The sign reads: "Let his death not be in vain." Library of Congress/Marion S. Trikosko/Handout via REUTERS

People demonstrate after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. in front of the White House in Washington, April 1968. The sign reads: "Let his death not be in vain." Library of Congress/Marion S. Trikosko/Handout via REUTERS

People demonstrate after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. in front of the White House in Washington, April 1968. The sign reads: "Let his death not be in vain." Library of Congress/Marion S. Trikosko/Handout via REUTERS
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A soldier stands guard at 7th and N Street, N.W., Washington, with the ruins of buildings destroyed during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., April 8, 1968. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

A soldier stands guard at 7th and N Street, N.W., Washington, with the ruins of buildings destroyed during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., April 8, 1968. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

A soldier stands guard at 7th and N Street, N.W., Washington, with the ruins of buildings destroyed during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., April 8, 1968. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
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Firefighters spray water on shops, including Beyda's, Miles Shoes and Grayson's, that were burned during the riots in Washington that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., April 1968. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Firefighters spray water on shops, including Beyda's, Miles Shoes and Grayson's, that were burned during the riots in Washington that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., April 1968. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Firefighters spray water on shops, including Beyda's, Miles Shoes and Grayson's, that were burned during the riots in Washington that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., April 1968. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
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A "Don't Work" sign promotes a day to honor the one-year anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., on a shop on H Street, N.W., Washington, April 3, 1969. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

A "Don't Work" sign promotes a day to honor the one-year anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., on a shop on H Street, N.W., Washington, April 3, 1969. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

A "Don't Work" sign promotes a day to honor the one-year anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., on a shop on H Street, N.W., Washington, April 3, 1969. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
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A store that was destroyed during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. is seen in Washington, April 16, 1968. Library of Congress/Warren K. Leffler/Handout via REUTERS

A store that was destroyed during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. is seen in Washington, April 16, 1968. Library of Congress/Warren K. Leffler/Handout via REUTERS

A store that was destroyed during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. is seen in Washington, April 16, 1968. Library of Congress/Warren K. Leffler/Handout via REUTERS
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Smoke rises near the U.S. Capitol, during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., April 6, 1968. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Smoke rises near the U.S. Capitol, during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., April 6, 1968. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters

Smoke rises near the U.S. Capitol, during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., April 6, 1968. REUTERS/Library of Congress/Handout via Reuters
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James Earl Ray, the man who assassinated Martin Luther King Jr., is transported in Memphis, Tennessee, 1968. 

REUTERS/Shelby County Register of Deeds/Handout

James Earl Ray, the man who assassinated Martin Luther King Jr., is transported in Memphis, Tennessee, 1968. REUTERS/Shelby County Register of Deeds/Handout

James Earl Ray, the man who assassinated Martin Luther King Jr., is transported in Memphis, Tennessee, 1968. REUTERS/Shelby County Register of Deeds/Handout
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James Earl Ray is patted down in Memphis, Tennessee, 1968. 

REUTERS/Shelby County Register of Deeds/Handout

James Earl Ray is patted down in Memphis, Tennessee, 1968. REUTERS/Shelby County Register of Deeds/Handout

James Earl Ray is patted down in Memphis, Tennessee, 1968. REUTERS/Shelby County Register of Deeds/Handout
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A wreath hangs on the balcony of the former Lorraine Motel, now part of the National Civil Rights Museum, where Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee, April 2, 2008. 

REUTERS/Mike Segar

A wreath hangs on the balcony of the former Lorraine Motel, now part of the National Civil Rights Museum, where Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee, April 2, 2008. REUTERS/Mike Segar

A wreath hangs on the balcony of the former Lorraine Motel, now part of the National Civil Rights Museum, where Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee, April 2, 2008. REUTERS/Mike Segar
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Room 306 at the former Lorraine Motel, where Martin Luther King Jr. slept before he was assassinated in 1968, seen in Memphis, Tennessee, April 2, 2008. 

REUTERS/Mike Segar

Room 306 at the former Lorraine Motel, where Martin Luther King Jr. slept before he was assassinated in 1968, seen in Memphis, Tennessee, April 2, 2008. REUTERS/Mike Segar

Room 306 at the former Lorraine Motel, where Martin Luther King Jr. slept before he was assassinated in 1968, seen in Memphis, Tennessee, April 2, 2008. REUTERS/Mike Segar
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The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial is shown in Washington August 22, 2011. The memorial to the American civil rights leader was officially dedicated on August 28, 2011, the 48th anniversary of King's "I have a dream" speech on the Washington Mall. 

REUTERS/Jason Reed

The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial is shown in Washington August 22, 2011. The memorial to the American civil rights leader was officially dedicated on August 28, 2011, the 48th anniversary of King's "I have a dream" speech on the Washington Mall....more

The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial is shown in Washington August 22, 2011. The memorial to the American civil rights leader was officially dedicated on August 28, 2011, the 48th anniversary of King's "I have a dream" speech on the Washington Mall. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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